Free Access
Issue
A&A
Volume 541, May 2012
Article Number A154
Number of page(s) 15
Section Interstellar and circumstellar matter
DOI https://doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201219053
Published online 22 May 2012

Online material

Appendix B: Finding chart, optical and Spitzer/IRAC images of the clouds in the vicinity of Gum/Vela

thumbnail Fig. B.1

Finding chart: Hα emission of the Gum Nebula region (from NASA/Skyview) with the 24 sources indicated by their name. The color code is the following: red = PAH/BRC emission, white = absorption, green = coreshine, yellow = absorption + coreshine, purple = PAH + coreshine. Full line circles indicate clear coreshine cases, dashed line circles indicate dubious coreshine cases. The cross in the middle is the reference position αJ2000 = 08h22m53.6s, δJ2000 = −42°25′20′′ for the Gum Nebula center.

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thumbnail Fig. B.2

Images of BHR22 = CG13. From left to right: optical, 3.6, 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 μm. Optical images are digitized photographic plate portions, hence not absolutely calibrated and no color bar is given. They only help to identify the objects. Infrared image scales (MJy sr-1) are adjusted to maximize the contrast. Coordinates are identical in all five boxes but shown only in the first box. Type of cloud: PAH emission (or BRC, see text), presence of an IRAS object.

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thumbnail Fig. B.3

Images of BHR14 = CG34. PAH emission and possibly coreshine, no embedded object. Same as Fig. B.2.

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thumbnail Fig. B.4

Images of BHR21= CG4. Coreshine and PAH emission, Class I object? Same as Fig. B.2.

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thumbnail Fig. B.5

Images of BHR16. Absorption, no embedded object. Same as Fig. B.2.

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thumbnail Fig. B.6

Images of CG30/31. PAH emission, Class 0/I object + HH120. Same as Fig. B.2.

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thumbnail Fig. B.7

Images of BHR7. Coreshine, Class 0/I object. Same as Fig. B.2.

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thumbnail Fig. B.8

Images of DC257.3-2.5. Absorption and possibly coreshine, presence of an IRAS object. Same as Fig. B.2.

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thumbnail Fig. B.9

Images of BHR31. Absorption, presence of an IRAS object. Same as Fig. B.2.

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thumbnail Fig. B.10

Images of DC266.0-7.5. Absorption, no embedded object. Same as Fig. B.2.

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thumbnail Fig. B.11

Images of BHR36. Absorption, Class I object + HH46/47. Same as Fig. B.2.

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thumbnail Fig. B.12

Images of BHR42. PAH emission. Same as Fig. B.2.

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thumbnail Fig. B.13

Images of BHR37. Absorption and PAH emission, no embedded object. Same as Fig. B.2.

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thumbnail Fig. B.14

Images of BHR41. Absorption, Class I object. Same as Fig. B.2.

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thumbnail Fig. B.15

Images of BHR13 = CG22. Absorption, Class II object. Same as Fig. B.2.

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thumbnail Fig. B.16

Images of BHR34. PAH emission and possibly coreshine, Class I object? Same as Fig. B.2.

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thumbnail Fig. B.17

Images of BHR40. PAH emission. Same as Fig. B.2.

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thumbnail Fig. B.18

Images of BHR38/39. PAH emission, no embedded object. Same as Fig. B.2.

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thumbnail Fig. B.19

Images of BHR56. Coreshine, Class 0 object. Same as Fig. B.2.

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thumbnail Fig. B.20

Images of BHR30. Absorption, no embedded object. Same as Fig. B.2.

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thumbnail Fig. B.21

Images of BHR43. Absorption, no embedded object. Same as Fig. B.2.

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thumbnail Fig. B.22

Images of BHR44. Absorption, no embedded object. Same as Fig. B.2.

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thumbnail Fig. B.23

Images of BHR53. Absorption, no embedded object. Same as Fig. B.2.

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thumbnail Fig. B.24

Images of BHR47. Absorption. Same as Fig. B.2.

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thumbnail Fig. B.25

Images of BHR55. Absorption, Class 0 object. Same as Fig. B.2.

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Appendix C: Optical and Spitzer/IRAC zoomed images of the clouds that show coreshine effect

thumbnail Fig. C.1

Zoom images of BHR14. If real, the coreshine emission fills the CG. The doubt comes from emission at 8 μm, probably due to PAH emission at the surface of the CG, which masks the expected absorption from the big grains. Same as Fig. B.2.

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thumbnail Fig. C.2

Zoom images of BHR21. Possibly the only case of extended coreshine (inside the hand-traced polygon). Same as Fig. B.2.

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thumbnail Fig. C.3

Zoom images of BHR7. The ellipse traces the PAH emission region, while the polygone traces the coreshine emission region. This emission seems to benefit from the presence of the protostar extended emission. Same as Fig. B.2.

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thumbnail Fig. C.4

Zoom images of DC257.3-2.5. The polygon traces the coreshine emission region. This emission could benefit from the presence of the (probable) protostar situated on its right or of the IRAS source at the bottom, though the link of the IRAS source with the cloud has not been checked yet and is possibly a chance alignment. There is also possibly some coreshine on the righthand side of the (proto)star but it is highly uncertain. Same as Fig. B.2.

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thumbnail Fig. C.5

Zoom images of BHR56.The coreshine emission is clearly visible by comparing the optical and the 3.6 μm images. The 4.5 image hardly shows any enhancement. Absorption is not visible at the longest wavelengths. Such a case of coreshine emission was already witnessed in our previous survey (Pagani et al. 2010). Same as Fig. B.2.

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thumbnail Fig. C.6

Zoom images of BHR34. The ellipse traces the possible coreshine emission region. Same as Fig. B.2.

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thumbnail Fig. C.7

Zoom images of BHR34 extended emission in IRAC data (computed with a background estimation function). Coreshine is possibly seen also below the infrared horizontal bar, but is mixed with PAH emission and therefore difficult to establish. Same as Fig. B.2.

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© ESO, 2012

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