EDP Sciences
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Erratum
This article is an erratum for: [this article]

Issue
A&A
Volume 602, June 2017
Article Number C2
Number of page(s) 7
Section Catalogs and data
DOI https://doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201525666e
Published online 14 June 2017

The function we used to calculate the logarithm of the false-detection probability provides the natural logarithm lnp and not the decadal logarithm as incorrectly assumed in the paper. This mildy affects the number of radial velocity (RV) variable stars and significantly the number of RV variable candidates in our sample. The conclusions of the paper essentially remain the same.

We consider the detection of RV variability to be significant, if the false-detection probability p is smaller than 0.01% (lnp< −9.2). The fraction of such significant detections in our initial sample of 196 is now 39% (76 objects). Objects with false-detection probabilities between 0.01% and 5% (lnp = −9.2 to lnp = −3.0) are regarded as candidates for RV variability and constitute 27% of the initial sample (53 objects). About 34% (lnp> −3.0, 67 objects) are regarded as non-detections. Removing those non-detections we end up with a sample of 129 stars, which show RV variability with probabilites between 95% and 99.9% (see Table 1).

Tables 35 and A.1 as well as Figures 16 of the original paper have been updated (Tables 25, Figs. 14).

The corrected upper limit for the fraction of extremely close binary sdB+NS/BH binaries is 1.5% instead of 1.3%.

The RV-variable sample now contains 18 helium-rich hot subdwarf stars. 6 of them show significant RV variations while 12 qualify as candidates (see Table 3). The He-sdOB J160450.44+051909.2 discussed in the paper is not regarded as RV-variable candidate any more.

Table 1

Sample statistics.

thumbnail Fig. 1

Left panel: Teff−log g diagram of the full sample of hot, subluminous, RV-variable stars. The size of the symbols scales with ΔRVmax. The black circles mark stars with hydrogen dominated atmospheres (log y< 0), while the red diamonds mark stars with helium dominated atmospheres. The helium main sequence (HeMS) and the HB band are superimposed with HB evolutionary tracks (dashed lines) for subsolar metallicity (log z = −1.48) from Dorman et al. (1993). The three tracks in the high temperature range correspond to helium core masses of 0.488, 0.490 and 0.495 M (from bottom-left to top-right). Those tracks mark the EHB evolution, since the stars do not reascend the giant branch in the helium shell-burning phase. The two tracks in the upper right correspond to core masses of 0.53 and 0.54 M. Blue horizontal branch stars following those tracks are expected to experience a second giant phase. The solid line marks the relevant part of the zero-age main sequence for solar metallicity taken from Schaller et al. (1992). The two dotted lines are post-AGB tracks for hydrogen-rich stars with masses of 0.546 (lower line) and 0.565 M (upper line) taken from Schönberner (1983). The two long-dashed lines are post-AGB tracks for helium-rich stars with masses of 0.53 (lower line) and 0.609 M (upper line) taken from Althaus et al. (2009). Right panel: Teff−log g diagram of RV variable hydrogen-rich sdB and sdOB stars. The two dotted lines mark post-RGB tracks (Driebe et al. 1998) for core masses of 0.234 (left) and 0,259 M (right).

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thumbnail Fig. 2

Left panel: highest RV shift between individual spectra plotted against time difference between the corresponding observing epochs. The filled red diamonds mark sdB binaries with known orbital parameters (Kupfer et al. 2015), while the filled black circles mark the rest of the hydrogen-rich sdB sample of RV variable stars. Right panel: the same plot for the hydrogen-rich sdOB and sdO sample of RV variable stars.

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thumbnail Fig. 3

ΔRVmax distribution of RV-variable sdB stars (left panel) as well as sdOB and sdO stars with hydrogen-rich atmospheres (right panel).

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thumbnail Fig. 4

Left panel: Teff−log g diagram of RV variable helium-rich sdOB and sdO stars (see Fig. 1). The size of the symbols scales with ΔRVmax. The helium main sequence (HeMS) and the HB band are superimposed with HB evolutionary tracks (dashed lines) for subsolar metallicity (log z = −1.48) from Dorman et al. (1993). The three tracks correspond to helium core masses of 0.488, 0.490 and 0.495 M (from bottom-left to top-right). Right panel: highest RV shift between individual spectra plotted against time difference between the corresponding observing epochs for helium-rich sdO and sdOB stars (see Fig. 2).

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Table 2

Parameters of 101 hydrogen-rich hot subdwarfs (65 RV variable, 36 RV variable candidates).

Table 3

Parameters of 18 helium-rich hot subdwarfs (6 RV variable, 12 RV variable candidates).

Table 4

Parameters of 10 other types of hot stars (5 RV variable, 5 RV variable candidates).

Table 5

Parameters of 67 stars with non-significant RV variations.

References


© ESO, 2017

All Tables

Table 1

Sample statistics.

Table 2

Parameters of 101 hydrogen-rich hot subdwarfs (65 RV variable, 36 RV variable candidates).

Table 3

Parameters of 18 helium-rich hot subdwarfs (6 RV variable, 12 RV variable candidates).

Table 4

Parameters of 10 other types of hot stars (5 RV variable, 5 RV variable candidates).

Table 5

Parameters of 67 stars with non-significant RV variations.

All Figures

thumbnail Fig. 1

Left panel: Teff−log g diagram of the full sample of hot, subluminous, RV-variable stars. The size of the symbols scales with ΔRVmax. The black circles mark stars with hydrogen dominated atmospheres (log y< 0), while the red diamonds mark stars with helium dominated atmospheres. The helium main sequence (HeMS) and the HB band are superimposed with HB evolutionary tracks (dashed lines) for subsolar metallicity (log z = −1.48) from Dorman et al. (1993). The three tracks in the high temperature range correspond to helium core masses of 0.488, 0.490 and 0.495 M (from bottom-left to top-right). Those tracks mark the EHB evolution, since the stars do not reascend the giant branch in the helium shell-burning phase. The two tracks in the upper right correspond to core masses of 0.53 and 0.54 M. Blue horizontal branch stars following those tracks are expected to experience a second giant phase. The solid line marks the relevant part of the zero-age main sequence for solar metallicity taken from Schaller et al. (1992). The two dotted lines are post-AGB tracks for hydrogen-rich stars with masses of 0.546 (lower line) and 0.565 M (upper line) taken from Schönberner (1983). The two long-dashed lines are post-AGB tracks for helium-rich stars with masses of 0.53 (lower line) and 0.609 M (upper line) taken from Althaus et al. (2009). Right panel: Teff−log g diagram of RV variable hydrogen-rich sdB and sdOB stars. The two dotted lines mark post-RGB tracks (Driebe et al. 1998) for core masses of 0.234 (left) and 0,259 M (right).

Open with DEXTER
In the text
thumbnail Fig. 2

Left panel: highest RV shift between individual spectra plotted against time difference between the corresponding observing epochs. The filled red diamonds mark sdB binaries with known orbital parameters (Kupfer et al. 2015), while the filled black circles mark the rest of the hydrogen-rich sdB sample of RV variable stars. Right panel: the same plot for the hydrogen-rich sdOB and sdO sample of RV variable stars.

Open with DEXTER
In the text
thumbnail Fig. 3

ΔRVmax distribution of RV-variable sdB stars (left panel) as well as sdOB and sdO stars with hydrogen-rich atmospheres (right panel).

Open with DEXTER
In the text
thumbnail Fig. 4

Left panel: Teff−log g diagram of RV variable helium-rich sdOB and sdO stars (see Fig. 1). The size of the symbols scales with ΔRVmax. The helium main sequence (HeMS) and the HB band are superimposed with HB evolutionary tracks (dashed lines) for subsolar metallicity (log z = −1.48) from Dorman et al. (1993). The three tracks correspond to helium core masses of 0.488, 0.490 and 0.495 M (from bottom-left to top-right). Right panel: highest RV shift between individual spectra plotted against time difference between the corresponding observing epochs for helium-rich sdO and sdOB stars (see Fig. 2).

Open with DEXTER
In the text

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