EDP Sciences
Free Access
Issue
A&A
Volume 499, Number 1, May III 2009
Page(s) 103 - 119
Section Galactic structure, stellar clusters, and populations
DOI https://doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/200810592
Published online 19 March 2009

Online Material

Table 1:   Data of the sample stars.

Table 2:   Log book of the observations.

Table 3:   Atmospheric parameters, as adopted from the literature, beryllium abundances as derived in this work, and lithium abundances, adopted from the literature when available or derived in this work when not. Details on the parameters and the abundances are given in the text. The reference papers of the atmospheric parameters and lithium abundances are also listed.

Table 6:   The probabilities of each star of belonging to the thin disk, the thick disk, and the halo as calculated by Venn (2004), the kinematic classification1 according to Gratton et al. (2003a,b), the average [$\alpha $/Fe], and the orbital parameters: minimum radii ( $R_{\rm min}$), maximum radii ( $R_{\rm max}$), maximum distance from the plane ( $Z_{\rm max}$), eccentricity, and rotational velocity.

Appendix A: Detailed comparison

In this section we present a detailed comparison of our Be abundance results with previous results from the literature on a star-by-star basis. In most of the cases where differences in the abundances are seen, differences in the $\log g$ values can also be found. In these cases we are confident our results are robust since our $\log g$ values show excellent agreement with the ones derived using Hipparcos parallaxes.

HIP 171 (HD 224930)

The Be abundance of star HIP 171 was previously determined by Stephens et al. (1997), $\log$(Be/H) = -11.02. The value we found, $\log$(Be/H) = -11.55, is somewhat different. This difference is most probably a result of the different $\log~g$ adopted; $\log g = 4.62$ by Stephens et al. (1997) and $\log g = 4.10$ by us.

HIP 11952 (HD 16031)

The Be abundance of HIP 11952 was previously determined by Gilmore et al. (1992). Adopting $\log g = 3.90$ and [Fe/H] = -1.96 they found $\log$(Be/H) = -12.37. Adopting $\log g = 4.20$ and [Fe/H] = -1.60, we found $\log$(Be/H) = -12.28, which shows a good agreement within the uncertainties, in spite of the different atmospheric parameters.

HIP 14594 (HD 19445)

The Be abundance of star HIP 14594 was previously determined by four papers. Rebolo et al. (1988) found an upper limit of $\log$(Be/H) < -11.70, Ryan et al. (1990) found an upper limit of $\log$(Be/H) < -12.30, Boesgaard & King (1993) found $\log$(Be/H) = -12.14, and Boesgaard et al. (1999) found a range of values from $\log$(Be/H)= -12.45 to -12.55. The value we derived, $\log$(Be/H) = -12.63, is in good agreement with the lower limit of the range derived by Boesgaard et al. (1999).

HIP 17001 (CD-24 1782)

The Be abundance of star HIP 17001 was previously determined by García Pérez & Primas (2006) who found $\log$(Be/H) = -13.45 in LTE and $\log$(Be/H) = -13.54 in NLTE. We derived an upper limit of $\log$(Be/H) < -13.83. The difference in the values is mainly due to the different $\log~g$ adopted, 3.00 by us and 3.46 by García Pérez & Primas (2006).

HIP 17147 (HD 22879)

The Be abundance of HIP 17147 was previously determined by Beckman et al. (1989), $\log$(Be/H) = -11.25, This value agrees well with the one found in this work, $\log$(Be/H) = -11.20.

HIP 18802 (HD 25704)

The Be abundance of star HIP 18802 was previously determined by Molaro et al. (1997a), $\log$(Be/H) = -11.61. In this work we found $\log$(Be/H) = -11.41. The $\log g$ values, although similar, $\log g = 4.20$ by Molaro et al. (1997a) and $\log g = 4.33$ by us, account for a difference of $\sim$0.08 dex in the abundance, what would bring them to an agreement within the uncertainties.

HIP 24316 (HD 34328)

The Be abundance of HIP 24316 was previously determined by Gilmore et al. (1992), $\log$(Be/H) = -11.90. This value agrees well with the value found in this work, $\log$(Be/H) = -11.98.

HIP 37853 (HR 3018)

The Be abundance of HIP 37853 was previously determined by Gilmore et al. (1992), $\log$(Be/H) = -11.20. This value agrees well with the one found in this work, $\log$(Be/H) = -11.16.

HIP 42592 (HD 74000)

The Be abundance of star HIP 42592 was previously determined by Ryan et al. (1990), $\log$(Be/H) < -12.20 and by Boesgaard et al. (1999), which found a range of values from $\log$(Be/H) = -12.03 to -12.47. The value found in this work, $\log$(Be/H) = -12.58, agrees with the lower limit of the range determined by Boesgaard et al. (1999), within the uncertainties. The small difference can be removed if we adopt the same $\log g$ used by Boesgaard et al., 0.16 dex higher than ours (increasing our abundance by $\sim$0.08 dex).

HIP 44075 (HD 76932)

The Be abundance of star HIP 44075 was determined by a number of papers in literature. Molaro & Beckman (1984) found an upper limit of $\log$(Be/H) < -11.52, Beckman et al. (1989) found $\log$(Be/H) = -11.69, both Gilmore et al. (1992) and Ryan et al. (1992) found $\log$(Be/H) = -11.30, Boesgaard & King (1993) found $\log$(Be/H) = -11.04, Garcia Lopez et al. (1995b) found $\log$(Be/H) = -11.36 (in NLTE), Thorburn & Hobbs (1996) found $\log$(Be/H) = -11.45, Molaro et al. (1997a) found -11.21, and Boesgaard et al. (1999) found a range of values from $\log$(Be/H)= -11.17 to -11.24. The value we found, $\log$(Be/H) = -11.12, is in the upper range of the values listed above and in good agreement with Boesgaard et al. (1999).

HIP 48152 (HD 84937)

For star HIP 48152, Ryan et al. (1992) found $\log$(Be/H) < -12.85, Boesgaard & King (1993) found $\log$(Be/H) = -12.85, Thorburn & Hobbs (1996) found $\log$(Be/H) < -12.95, and Boesgaard et al. (1999), from $\log$(Be/H)= -12.83 to -12.94. The value we derived is $\log$(Be/H) = -12.67. Reducing our $\log g$ by 0.20 dex to match the one adopted by Boesgaard et al. (1999), for example, would reduce our abundance by $\sim$0.11 dex, resulting in an agreement within the uncertainties.

HIP 53070 (HD 94028)

For HIP 53070, Boesgaard & King (1993) found $\log$(Be/H) = -11.56, Garcia Lopez et al. (1995b) found $\log$(Be/H) = -11.66 (in NLTE), Thorburn & Hobbs (1996) found $\log$(Be/H) = -11.65, and Boesgaard et al. (1999) found a range of values from $\log$(Be/H)= -11.51 to -11.55. The value we derived is $\log$(Be/H) = -11.80. Once again, a change in the adopted $\log~g$ would bring the abundances to a better agreement.

HIP 55022 (HD 97916)

For HIP 55022, Boesgaard (2007) found $\log$(Be/H) < -13.30 while we derived $\log$(Be/H) < = -12.75.

HIP 59750 (HD 106516)

For HIP 59750, Molaro et al. (1997a) found $\log$(Be/H) < -12.76 and Stephens et al. (1997) found $\log$(Be/H) < -12.61. The upper-limit we derived is $\log$(Be/H) < -12.50, agrees with the previous results within the uncertainties.

HIP 64426 (HD 114762)

For HIP 64426, Stephens et al. (1997) found $\log$(Be/H) = -11.05, Boesgaard & King (1993) found $\log$(Be/H) = -11.14, Santos et al. (2002) found $\log$(Be/H) = -11.03, and Santos et al. (2004) found $\log$(Be/H) = -11.18. The value we derived is $\log$(Be/H) = -11.31. The difference is again related to the different choice of $\log~g$ values.

HIP 71458 (HD 128279)

For HIP 71458, Molaro et al. (1997a) found $\log$(Be/H) = -12.75 and by García Pérez & Primas (2006) found $\log$(Be/H) < -14.01, in LTE, and $\log$(Be/H) = -13.94 in NLTE. We derived an upper limit of $\log$(Be/H) < -13.90.

HIP 74079 (HD 134169)

The Be abundance of HIP 74079 was previously determined by five papers. Gilmore et al. (1992) and Ryan et al. (1992) both found $\log$(Be/H) = -11.35, Boesgaard & King (1993) found $\log$(Be/H) = -11.29, Garcia Lopez et al. (1995b) found $\log$(Be/H) = -11.23 (in NLTE), and Boesgaard et al. (1999) found a range of values from $\log$(Be/H) = -11.32 to $\log$(Be/H) = -11.40. All these values agree with ours, $\log$(Be/H) = -11.28, within the uncertainties.

HIP 80837 (HD 148816)

The Be abundance of HIP 80837 was previously determined by Stephens et al. (1997), $\log$(Be/H) = -11.07 and by Boesgaard & King (1993), $\log$(Be/H) = -11.10. Both values are consistent with ours, $\log$(Be/H) = -11.22, within the uncertainties.

HIP 87693 (BD+20 3603)

The Be abundance of star HIP 87693 was previously determined by Boesgaard et al. (1999) who found a range of values from $\log$(Be/H) = -12.40 to $\log$(Be/H) = -12.62. Our value, $\log$(Be/H) = -12.77, is again consistent, within the uncertainties, with the lower limit of the range found by Boesgaard et al. (1999). The difference in the adopted $\log g$ values, 4.33 or 4.27 by Boesgaard et al. and 4.00 by us, seems to be the main reason for the different abundances.

HIP 98532 (HD 189558)

The Be abundance of star HIP 98532 was previously determined by Rebolo et al. (1988) who found $\log$(Be/H) = -11.70 and by Boesgaard & King (1993) who found $\log$(Be/H) = -10.99. Both papers claim higher uncertainties for this star when compared with the other stars of the sample. We determined a value of $\log$(Be/H) = -11.43, which is intermediate between the two previous determinations.

HIP 100792 (HD 194598)

The Be abundance of star HIP 100792 was previously determined by three papers. Rebolo et al. (1988) found $\log$(Be/H) = -11.70, Thorburn & Hobbs (1996) found $\log$(Be/H) = -11.95, and Boesgaard et al. (1999) found a range of values from $\log$(Be/H)= -11.73 to -11.88. The value determined in this work is $\log$(Be/H) = -11.97. Our result agrees very well with the one from Thorburn & Hobbs (1996) although they adopt a smaller $\log g$, 4.00, when compared to ours, $\log g = 4.20$. Within the uncertainties, our result agrees with the lower limit of the range of values found by Boesgaard et al. (1999).

HIP 101346 (HD 195633)

The Be abundance of star HIP 101346 was previously determined in three papers. Boesgaard & King (1993) found $\log$(Be/H) = -11.21, Stephens et al. (1997) found $\log$(Be/H) = -11.29, and Boesgaard & Novicki (2006) found $\log$(Be/H)= -11.34. Our value is somewhat smaller than these, $\log$(Be/H) = -11.52. The parameter controlling most of this difference seems to be the metallicity. We adopt [Fe/H] = -0.50, while Boesgaard & King (1993) adopt [Fe/H] = -1.07, Stephens et al. (1997) [Fe/H] = -1.00, and Boesgaard & Novicki (2006) [Fe/H] = -0.88. Adopting the value of Boesgaard & Novicki (2006), for example, would increase our result by 0.08 dex, bringing the values to agree within the uncertainties.

HIP 104660 (HD 201889)

The Be abundance of star HIP 104660 was previously determined by Boesgaard & King (1993), $\log$(Be/H) = -11.43, and by Boesgaard et al. (1999) which found a range of values from $\log$(Be/H)= -11.30 to -11.38. Our value, $\log$(Be/H) = -11.41, is in excellent agreement with these.

HIP 105858 (HR 8181)

The Be abundance of HIP 105858 was previously determined by Gilmore et al. (1992). A value of $\log$(Be/H) = -11.40 was found, in excellent agreement with ours, $\log$(Be/H) = -11.32.

HIP 107975 (HD 207978)

The Be abundance of star HIP 107975 was previously determined by Stephens et al. (1997), which found an upper limit of $\log$(Be/H) < -12.38. Our analysis provides a detection mainly based on line 3131 Å, $\log$(Be/H) = -12.25.

HIP 108490 (HD 208906)

The Be abundance of star HIP 108490 was previously determined in three papers. Boesgaard & King (1993) found $\log$(Be/H) = -11.10, Stephens et al. (1997) found $\log$(Be/H) = -11.19, and Boesgaard et al. (2004) found $\log$(Be/H) = -11.30. This last value is in excellent agreement with our own, $\log$(Be/H) = -11.34. The difference with Boesgaard & King (1993) can be explained by the smaller $\log g$ adopted by them, $\log~g = 4.25$, when compared with the one adopted in this work, $\log g = 4.41$ (and also by Boesgaard et al. 2004).

HIP 109558 (BD+17 4708)

The Be abundance of star HIP 109558 was previously determined by Boesgaard et al. (1999), who found a range of values from $\log$(Be/H)= -12.28 to -12.42. Our result, $\log$(Be/H) = -12.30, is in excellent agreement with this range.

HIP 114271 (HD 218502)

The Be abundance of HIP 114271 was previously determined by Molaro et al. (1997a), $\log$(Be/H) = -12.56. Our result, $\log$(Be/H) = -12.44, agrees with it within the uncertainties.

HIP 114962 (HD 219617)

For HIP 114962, Rebolo et al. (1988) found $\log$(Be/H) < -11.60, Molaro et al. (1997a) found $\log$(Be/H) = -12.56, and Boesgaard et al. (1999) found a range from $\log$(Be/H) = -12.09 to -12.15. Our value, $\log$(Be/H) = -12.40, is closer to the value found by Molaro et al. (1997a) than to the one by Boesgaard et al. (1999) although our parameters are very different from the former and similar to the latter.

Appendix B: F00 subsample

In this appendix we show plots of the relations between $\log$(Be/H) and [Fe/H] (Fig. B.1) and between $\log$(Be/H) and [$\alpha $/H] (Fig. B.2) for the stars of the F00 subsample. The fits are statistically identical to the ones obtained with the whole clean sample.

 \begin{figure}
\par\includegraphics[width=7cm,clip]{0592fi21.eps}
\end{figure} Figure B.1:

Diagram of [Fe/H] vs. $\log$(Be/H) for the stars analyzed by Fulbright (2000). Only detections are shown. An example of error bar is shown in the lower right corner.

Open with DEXTER

 \begin{figure}
\par\includegraphics[width=7cm,clip]{0592fi22.eps}
\end{figure} Figure B.2:

Diagram of [$\alpha $/H] vs. $\log$(Be/H) for the stars analyzed by Fulbright (2000). Only detections are shown. An example of error bar is shown in the lower right corner.

Open with DEXTER

Appendix C: Accretion and Dissipative Components

In this appendix we divide our sample in an ``accretion'' and a ``dissipative'' component according to the prescriptions of Gratton et al. (2003a,b).

The purpose is to test whether the same characteristics of our sample would be obtained with this different classification. The division of the stars according to this classification is also listed in Table 6. Some of the stars classified as thin disk stars by Venn et al. (2004) are classified as stars of the dissipative component by the criteria of Gratton et al. (2003a,b). In the clean sample we have 34 stars classified as accretion component and 39 as dissipative component. In Figs. C.1, C.2, C.3, and C.4, we show how these components behave in each of the plots presented before for the halo and thick disk components. Therefore, these should be directly compared with Figs. 171920. As it can be seen, the overlap is really high and the conclusions obtained are the same.

 \begin{figure}
\par\includegraphics[width=7cm,clip]{0592fi23.eps}
\end{figure} Figure C.1:

Diagram of [$\alpha $/Fe] vs. $\log$(Be/H). The dissipative component stars are shown in the upper panel while the accretion component stars are shown in the lower panel. The dissipative stars diagram is characterized by a large scatter while the accretion stars diagram clearly divides in two sequences.

Open with DEXTER

 \begin{figure}
\par\includegraphics[width=7cm,clip]{0592fi24.eps}
\end{figure} Figure C.2:

Diagram of et al. $\log$(Be/H) vs. the V, the component of the space velocity of the star in the direction of the disk rotation. The dissipative component stars are shown as filled circles, accretion stars are shown as starred symbols, and the subgroup of accretion stars as open circles. A typical error of $\pm $12 Km s-1 in V was adopted (see Gratton et al. 2003b).

Open with DEXTER

 \begin{figure}
\par\includegraphics[width=7cm,clip]{0592fi25.eps}
\end{figure} Figure C.3:

Diagram of $\log$(Be/H) vs. $R_{\rm min}$, the perigalactic distance of stellar orbit. The dissipative stars are shown as filled circles, accretion stars are shown as starred symbols, and the subgroup of accretion stars as open circles. A typical error of $\pm $0.40 Kpc in $R_{\rm min}$ was adopted (see Gratton et al. 2003b).

Open with DEXTER

 \begin{figure}
\par\includegraphics[width=7cm,clip]{0592fi26.eps}
\end{figure} Figure C.4:

Diagram of $\log$(Be/H) vs. [Fe/H] where only the accretion stars are shown. The subgroup of stars with low alpha is shown as open circles, the remaining accretion stars are shown as starred symbols. The linear fit for all the accretion stars is shown to guide the eye.

Open with DEXTER


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