Free Access
Issue
A&A
Volume 549, January 2013
Article Number A101
Number of page(s) 7
Section Catalogs and data
DOI https://doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201220398
Published online 04 January 2013

© ESO, 2013

1. Introduction

In the era of automatic sky surveys and space telescopes, it is increasingly obvious that there is a high percentage of RR Lyrae type stars exhibiting the Blazhko effect (more than 40%, Kolenberg et al. 2010). The light curves of such stars are amplitude- or phase-modulated with the periods typically in the order of tens to hundreds of days1. This behaviour is named after one of its discoverers, S. N. Blazhko (1907), who noticed it in RW Dra.

Many theories, such as resonances between radial and nonradial modes (Dziembowski & Mizerski 2004), effects connected with convection (Stothers 2006), etc., have tried to describe observed properties, but the explanation of the nature of the Blazhko effect is still missing. A brief overview of the Blazhko effect can be found in Kovács (2009) and Kolenberg (2012). Nowadays, the most likely explanation of the Blazhko effect is considered resonance between the fundamental radial mode and the ninth overtone (Buchler & Kolláth 2011).

Some partial lists of the Blazhko stars have been published (e.g. Smith 1995; Sódor & Wils 2005; Le Borgne et al. 2012), but an overall list has not been available until now. Such a list allows observers and all interested astronomers to quickly check the Blazhko instability of the star in one place and see whether the star needs further observations or not.

2. The list

The list contains values based on the data from sky surveys ASAS (Szczygiel & Fabrycky 2007) and NSVS (Wils et al. 2006), as well as the data based on O−C diagram analyses (Le Borgne et al. 2012), and finally it contains values obtained in detailed studies of many of these stars. Stars with only one modulation period are listed in Table 1, stars with multiple Blazhko period are in Table 2, and RR Lyraes with variable Blazhko period are in Table 3.

Coordinates and magnitude ranges were taken from the VSX database (Watson et al. 2006). If there is more than one available value of the Blazhko period, then the value with the highest priority is given. The hierarchy of cited references is the following: Values taken from detail studies have the highest priority, data from surveys have lower priority, and the the data based on O−C studies the lowest priority. There are some exceptions, mainly if the data with higher priority were published before 1990 or if the data are of worse quality than values with lower priority. If the values of Blazhko periods differ more than one day, then all available values are listed.

The stars are sorted by right ascension. If possible, the ASAS and other designations of the stars were transformed to GCVS names. This is the case of V1820 Ori, BB Lep, V339 Lup, MR Lib, V559 Hya, V552 Hya, V701 Pup, LR Eri, IY Eri, GW Cet, DZ Oct, V354 Vir, V419 Vir, V476 Vir, V551 Vir, OR Com, BT Sco, V1319 Sco, BT Ant, AD UMa, NS UMa, PP UMa, KV Cnc, AI Crt, and FR Psc, which were noted in Wils et al. (2006) and Szczygiel & Fabrycky (2007) in other forms.

There are three stars with special characteristics in the list. These objecst deserve to be observed as a matter of priority. Some indications show that BV Aqr is a RRd type (Jerzykiewicz 1995). VX Her is suspected to be a member of an eclipsing binary star (Fitch et al. 1966), which is the first possible occurrence of such objects among RR Lyraes. SU Col probably has three modulation periods, which is also unique behaviour (Szczygiel & Fabrycky 2007). Some stars have a very short period (less than 0.23 d) or amplitude (about 0.1). These objects should be observed first.

Objects with very long (more than 1000 d) Blazko period are marked by a colon in the second column. The same mark may be used for stars that are only suspected of the Blazhko effect or whose Blazhko period is not well determined. A regularly updated list with Tables 13 is also available on the web page http://physics.muni.cz/~blasgalf.

Table 1

List of Blazhko stars with one modulation period.

Table 2

Blazhko stars with multiple modulations.

Table 3

Stars with changing Blazhko period.


1

There are also several stars with changing Blazhko effect.

Acknowledgments

Work on the paper have been supported by GACR project GD205/08/H005, MU MUNI/A/0968/2009. The International Variable Star Index (VSX) database, operated at AAVSO, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA have been used. This research also have made use of VizieR catalogue access tool, CDS, Strasbourg, France. I would like to thank Miloslav Zejda for usefull comments and suggestions.

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All Tables

Table 1

List of Blazhko stars with one modulation period.

Table 2

Blazhko stars with multiple modulations.

Table 3

Stars with changing Blazhko period.

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