EDP Sciences
Free access
Issue
A&A
Volume 381, Number 2, January II 2002
Page(s) 653 - 667
Section The Sun
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361:20011292


A&A 381, 653-667 (2002)
DOI: 10.1051/0004-6361:20011292

Properties of ultraviolet lines observed with the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS/SOHO) in coronal holes and the quiet Sun

K. Stucki1, 2, S. K. Solanki3, C. D. Pike4, U. Schühle3, I. Rüedi5, A. Pauluhn1, 6, 7 and A. Brkovic1

1  Institute of Astronomy, ETH-Zentrum, 8092 Zürich, Switzerland
2  Swiss Air Force, Ueg/RLT, 6055 Alpnach, Switzerland
3  Max-Planck-Institut für Aeronomie, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau, Germany
4  Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon, OX11 0QX, UK
5  PMOD/WRC, CH-7260 Davos Dorf, Switzerland
6  INTEC HTA Bern, Switzerland
7  International Space Science Institute, Bern, Switzerland

(Received 28 May 2001 / Accepted 10 September 2001)

Abstract
We present an analysis of 14 ultraviolet emission lines belonging to different atoms and ions observed inside polar coronal holes and in the normal quiet Sun. The observations were made with the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). This study extends previous investigations made with the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) spectrometer to higher temperatures. We compare line intensities, shifts and widths in coronal holes with the corresponding values obtained in the quiet Sun. While all lines formed at temperatures above $7 \times 10^5$ K show clearly the presence of the hole in their intensities, differences in line width are more subtle, with cooler lines being broader in coronal holes, while hotter lines tend to be narrower. According to the present data all lines are blueshifted inside the coronal hole compared to the normal quiet Sun. Almost all the lines formed between 80 000 K and 600 000 K (i.e. transition-region lines) show a correlation between blueshifts and brightness within coronal holes. This is in agreement with the conclusion reached by Hassler et al. (1999) that the fast solar wind emanates from the network and supports our previous study (Stucki et al. 2000b). For coronal lines, this trend seems to be reversed.


Key words: Sun: corona -- solar wind -- transition region -- UV radiation

Offprint request: K. Stucki, katja.stucki@lw.admin.ch




© ESO 2002

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