... carbon[*]
This term actually covers a variety of materials with different microscopic structures and different optical properties (see discussion in Andersen et al. (2003).
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... regime)[*]
At the relevant wavelengths, the opacity of amorphous carbon grains is roughly proportional to $1/\lambda$. Therefore the carbon grains absorb and emit radiation preferentially at short wavelengths. This property, in combination with the radiative equilibrium condition, requires the grains to be hotter than the radiation temperature in order to emit as much energy as they absorb.
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...)[*]
Note, again, that the degree of condensation of Si is a direct measure of the amount of silicate grains formed in the wind.
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Copyright ESO 2007